June 19, 2013

Science Rejected: Another Hastings Con Job at UFO Chronicles


By James Carlson

Robert Hastings

UFO researcher Robert Hastings recently published an internet article at TheUFOChronicles.com entitled “Science and UFOs: Part 1 – The Condon Committee Con Job” that has – like the spontaneous erosion of mental acuity at a frat house every time someone screams beer run! – been reprinted at every UFO website in the market for free copy without any real concern for content. It’s another of Hastings’ standard rants addressed to the base of UFOlogy, one intended to elevate the worth of his name to a population of readers more than willing to trust his ethics and believe his claims for one reason and one reason alone: he tells them exactly what they want to hear. He does so, in fact, confident that few will ever challenge his claims, let alone conduct an honest hour or so of basic research to determine whether the extent of his sincerity can be measured in the quality of his claims. Had they been inclined to do so in the past, they would have discovered long ago how irresponsible he is with facts, how willing he’s been to distort the claims of witnesses, and how eager he is to insert his own unchecked, and ill-conceived personal contributions into UFO accounts merely to increase that false sense of credibility in an environment already considered lethal to such commonly valued standards of integrity. It’s like a bad comic trying to merge the local drunk’s steamy leavings with one more example of pop culture’s endless aperitifs.

The primary source Robert Hastings uses to address his alleged Condon “Con Job” issue is the testimony of Dr. James E. McDonald, a highly flawed individual who, like many others, allowed the UFO issue to consume his better instincts. He was once a reasonably successful scientist who was published regularly in well-respected scientific journals and compendiums throughout his career, the only exception being the entire period encompassing his UFO assessments and studies. During that period, he wrote nothing at all that science-oriented journals were willing to be associated with. They refused en masse to publish his claims and conclusions, because he was unable to support them with anything even approaching the use of standard, scientific methods. He could not even articulate the means by which one could test the assumptions he willingly made throughout the remainder of his life. The reasons for this are obvious. Although he was a gifted physicist, McDonald had little intuitive comprehension of human psychology, and was unable to differentiate between the varied levels of “truth” inherent to witness testimony. And let’s be very clear: UFOlogy is nothing but witness testimony. McDonald’s solution to his little quandary was to accept that everything he was told must be true. And like many others trying to find complex technical solutions to relatively uncomplicated psychological problems, it wrecked him. He could have saved himself a lot of very personal grief if he had simply monitored a few college courses on trial law and observed a few legal disputes in action. Instead, he took it all too personally with disastrous results, because he couldn’t figure out what was actually going on around him every day of the week. UFOlogy didn’t need physicists – it needed folklorists and historians who were well-equipped and willing to focus on formative religions during periods of technical and social uncertainty. McDonald might have saved himself a world’s worth of grief if he had simply stepped back from the brink of his own despair, dropped the study of UFOs completely, and spent a few months of private study and self-reflection with somebody like Carl Jung, who had tried so hard to unravel the spastic convulsions typical of human myths, dreams, and symbols.

Dr. James E. McDonald

McDonald’s frustrations in the budding field of UFOlogy, his perceived failure to validate what he insisted must be true, and his inability to do anything at all that might eventually vindicate his reputation eventually led him to commit suicide. Robert Hastings not only accepts everything this man essentially failed to prove as if it were already validated fact, he even refers to McDonald as “one of the very few scientists to actually study the UFO phenomenon”, an incredible distortion of reality that he’s completely unable to establish, primarily because he’s so grievously wrong. Most educated Americans can unravel this twisted assessment for themselves by merely conducting the simple fact-finding exercises that those who publish Hastings’ tripe should conduct for themselves before giving voice to these ridiculous fictions. Dr. James E. McDonald was not “one of the very few scientists to actually study the UFO phenomenon,” as there have been many, one example of which is the same Condon Committee he’s attempting to discredit. He was, however, one of UFOlogy’s first failures, primarily because he lacked the means to adjudicate the worth of human testimony. In a world in which human testimony is the only evidence available, the willingness to believe is a handicap. McDonald’s failure and his inability to come to grips with that aspect of his research is proof of that.

In addition to McDonald, Robert Hastings once more evokes the contents of a memorandum dated August 9, 1966, that the Condon investigative committee’s project coordinator, Robert Low, originally drafted to convince two undecided members of the University of Colorado administration to accept the Condon UFO study contract offered by the USAF. It was undertaken to persuade the University administration to accept a contract that every other investigative body, university, and college had already refused to accept for the very same concerns held by the individuals Low addressed his comments to: that nothing of scholastic, let alone scientific worth could ever come about as a result of accepting such a contract. Low believed that the publication of such a study could eventually bring the University a level of common renown that it was very much lacking at the time, and he was willing to suggest how the acceptance of such a study should be interpreted by those still undecided. He was allaying fears, not outlining policy. Given the fact that those who were involved in the research and investigations necessary to reach valid, scientific conclusions were completely unaware of the contents of that memorandum, and had, in fact, already adopted a scientific and completely ethical approach to the Condon UFO study that was supported not only by every scientist involved, but by every scientist who later examined that very issue, it’s a bit disingenuous of Robert Hastings to suggest that policy was being determined. Dr. Edward Condon, a well-respected scientist who had been involved with the Manhattan Project during World War Two, was completely unaware of the memo’s contents and was blindsided when McDonald questioned him about it. At the time, Dr. James E. McDonald knew more about its contents than Condon did. Low’s memo, in fact, was a complete non-event in regard to any possible influence it may have had on the conclusions reached by the University of Colorado UFO Project. Even Dr. J. Allen Hynek insisted that Robert Low’s memo was insignificant, and shouldn’t be used to reject Condon’s assessment of UFOs. Hastings is often very good at neglecting important details while adamantly refusing to discuss or mention anything that presents sufficient information to reach a valid, knowledge-based conclusion; it is his modus operandi, one that he has resorted to for most of his career in a sad attempt to suggest credibility that does not otherwise exist.  He’s like a prosecuting lawyer who presents only that evidence that suggests motive and opportunity in relation to the defendant, while neglecting to tell the jury that the defendant was at home eating Chinese fried chicken at a family reunion of 60-people when the crime he’s accused of took place.  He tells obvious lies of omission, yes, but they are also remarkably stupid lies of omission.  Unfortunately, he’s considered something of an authority in a field that doesn’t really concern itself with credibility.  Well, good for him.

Given that a panel of the National Academy of Sciences, one of the oldest and most respected scientific organizations in the world, was charged “to provide an independent assessment of the scope, methodology, and findings of the (University of Colorado) study as reflected in the (University’s) Report”, I hardly think Robert Hastings’ paranoid and baseless whining is even necessary, let alone reasonable. After all, the National Academy of Sciences was given a congressional charter to properly assess questions of science and provide functional advisement to the government of the United States in regard to those questions, while Hastings merely lectures to mostly ignorant audiences while refusing point blank to answer detailed questions or otherwise provide sufficient information to correct that ignorance, thereby ensuring the outcome of an accurate and educated conclusion.

The UFO panel’s report can be found at http://project1947.com/shg/articles/nascu.html. Among its findings are the following points:

1. “In our opinion the scope of the study was adequate to its purpose: a scientific study of UFO phenomena.”

2. “We think the methodology and approach were well chosen, in accordance with accepted standards of scientific investigation.”

3. The National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel concurred with the Condon UFO study’s conclusion that there is no basis for the contention that the subject of UFOs is “shrouded in official secrecy”.

4. The National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel concurred with the Condon UFO study’s conclusion that “the history of the past 21 years has repeatedly led Air Force officers to the conclusion that none of the things seen, or thought to have been seen, which pass by the name of UFO reports, constituted any hazard or threat to national security.”

5. The National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel concurred with the Condon UFO study’s finding that there is no reason to suggest that the investigation of future UFO sightings might “contribute to the advance of science”. In recognition of this, they recommended the Department of Defense handle reports of UFO activity in the context of “normal surveillance operations,” without necessitating the use of special investigative units such as Project Blue Book.

6. The National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel concurred with the Condon UFO study’s finding that there is no need for the federal government to “set up a major new agency … for the scientific study of UFOs”.

7. The National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel concurred with the Condon UFO study’s finding that “nothing has come from the study of UFOs in the past 21 years that has added to scientific knowledge.”

8. The National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel concurred with the Condon UFO study’s finding that associated “important areas of atmospheric optics, including radio wave propagation, and of atmospheric electricity” are of fundamental scientific interest, and “are relevant to practical problems related to the improvement of safety of military and civilian flying.” For this reason, “scientists with adequate training and credentials who do come up with a clearly defined, specific proposal” should be supported.

9. The National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel also concurred with the Condon UFO study’s observation that UFO reports and beliefs may also be of interest to “the social scientist and the communications specialist.” For this reason, “scientists with adequate training and credentials who do come up with a clearly defined, specific proposal” should be supported.

10. The National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel concurred with the Condon UFO study’s conclusive observation that there appears to be “no reason to attribute them [UFOs] to an extraterrestrial source without evidence that is much more convincing.” This extends as well to the study’s conclusion that “the least likely explanation of UFOs is the hypothesis of extraterrestrial visitations by intelligent beings.”

11. The final conclusions reached by the National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel are balanced and orderly: “We are unanimous in the opinion that this has been a very creditable effort to apply objectively the relevant techniques of science to the solution of the UFO problem.”

It should be evident that Robert Hastings is somewhat handicapped when it comes to determining the value of any evidential support for or rejection of his claims. His refusal to address any balanced arguments whatsoever tends to result in exceptional failure, particularly when it becomes necessary to examine that failure in the context of properly interpreted evidence, the responsible application of which Hastings has shown a marked contempt for.

The National Academy of Sciences reviewing panel even sought the input of Dr. James McDonald, making an aggressive effort to review a number of reports the Condon Committee had neglected for one reason or another to review. The panel nonetheless approved of every conclusion to every argument the UFO study took into account. Does Robert Hastings believe that the National Academy of Sciences was also party to the egregious cover-up that he accuses the Condon Committee of perpetrating, or does his noteworthy paranoia in regard to scholarly assessments prevent him from reaching a balanced interpretation of Condon’s UFO report? There seems to be little doubt that something irresponsible and contrary to the well-assessed disciplines of scientific endeavor seems to have taken place somewhere between the National Academy of Science’s contemporary review of the Condon Committee’s study and Robert Hastings’ near clownish criticism of the same. It’s almost like he decided well in advance of his published condemnation that he wouldn’t even read the panel’s review accompanying the publication of the study’s report.

Upon a thorough examination of Hastings’ assessment of Condon’s study, it’s hard not to conclude that Hastings’ primary grievance with the University of Colorado’s UFO Study is somewhere tied to his outrageous claims that the USAF had insisted in advance that Condon’s study reach a very specific conclusion that would allow them to publically disown any further interest in UFO phenomena. A more balanced examination, however, shows us almost immediately that the USAF didn’t need Condon to reach the conclusions that the National Academy of Sciences also concurred with wholeheartedly. The fact is, the conclusions Condon reached had already been publically affirmed two years prior to the UFO study that was undertaken, making Hastings’ charges of a whitewash sheer lunacy – one more paranoid take of an issue he has proven himself both incapable and unworthy of examining with any real honesty.

Dr. Edward Condon and LBJ

What we’ve got here is just another case of whining by a UFO researcher who refuses to accept conclusions that the National Academy of Sciences found perfectly reasonable to adopt upon its examination of the very same issue. What we’re actually looking at is merely another attempt by UFO proponents to rewrite and reassess ancient history in a vainglorious and ill-advised attempt to whitewash their own past failure to properly address these same issues. It’s no accident that the only real evidence being presented in support of continuing UFO studies is, to a great extent, little more than the reinterpretation of decades-old accounts. The reasons for adopting such a seemingly self-defeatist strategy should be obvious. Since 1947, UFOlogy in general has defined the very character of failure, part of which is due to the previously referred to yet nonetheless habitual refusal of those attempting to promote these cases to examine all of the evidence available instead of merely those elements supporting the possibility that UFOs are somehow worthy of our attention. The fact that new cases, for the most part, have proven to be relatively easy to dismiss with real cause leaves those promoting this abject assessment with few options outside of rejuvenating older cases after their somewhat justifiable dismissal from further assessment many, many years ago. Attempts to refocus current interest on paranoid concerns that the reexamination of incidents 20 to 60 years ago supports the contention that UFOs are interested in nuclear weapons facilities is merely more misleading crap on the windmills, a desperate bid for undeserved attention that less flawed investigators dismissed years ago. Robert Hastings’ arguments aren’t new or original; they’re merely sour propaganda based on incomplete cases, the unbalanced consideration of available data, undisguised contempt for the fruits of actual science, and the repressive, illegible scrawls of men like Dr. James E. McDonald, who ended up killing himself when his obsession started to ruin his life, tear apart his family, and destroy what scholastic reputation he had somehow managed to foster before jumping on a bandwagon that he wasn’t psychologically equipped to encounter with any real sense of grace.

Perhaps this is why Robert Hastings has in the past found it necessary to invent or distort evidence, to lie about his witnesses’ statements and the conclusions reached on their basis, and has presented fraudulent claims thinly disguised as UFO testimony – all of which he has done repeatedly and liberally over the years. As a result, I hardly think his credibility is anywhere near that of the National Academy of Sciences (or the Condon Committee, for that matter). After all, they have over 200 Noble Prize recipients to rely on, while all Robert Hastings has got is a little sad experience promoting a hoax – and doing so in the absence of any ethical or educated assessment. It isn’t appropriate or honest, and he hardly qualifies as the expert witness called upon to reassess historical points of view regarding matters he doesn’t understand, is ill-equipped to examine, and has no intention of doing so with the open mind that science demands of both its critics and its champions.

In other words, he’s produced one more plaintive cry in the wilderness that we can safely and properly ignore as a complete waste of time.







October 13, 2009

Jacques Vallee Crosses UFO Research with Psychic Research


brain2One of the things that we’ve mentioned often here, in our review of the general belief system many of the Parapsychologists/Paraphysicists had during the the early government/SRI psychic research was that there was an obvious intersection in the 1970’s between UFO research and Psychic research, such as in our MJ-12 philosophy article. A long list of strange events took place during that time that indicate a few individuals working with the SRI psychic research project, either directly or indirectly, had a hand in the creation and distribution of strange tales and myths over the next few decades. We’ve revealed all of the evidence that proves, beyond any doubt, the involvement of Dr. Christopher Green and Dr. Hal Puthoff through the years, from MJ-12 and all the way up to Project Serpo. In our last blog update we also finally revealed Kit Green’s admission that a small group of three “intellectuals,” including himself and Hal Puthoff, came up with a “Core Story” that represented what those three men commonly believed regarding the UFO phenomenon. The third man was Jacques Vallee.

In our last post we revealed how the prolific Jacques Vallee, who was giving a great many interviews throughout the 1970s to promote his new Ufology books, suggested that the phenomenon represented an informational control system and that researchers should be looking for patterns in order to understand the phenomenon. Next, I would like to cover another early interview with Jacques Vallee published in 1978 by FATE Magazine.

Vallee Ties Ufology to Religion in Passport to Magonia

In his 1969 publication Passport to Magonia, Vallee makes it clear that he’s no typical Ufo believer. Rather, he represents a new group of Ufologists that are to arise throughout the 1970’s from the small legion of Parapsychologists working on the question of psychic functioning. In doing so, Vallee ties the UFO phenomenon not to physical extraterrestrial visitations, but to existing religious belief systems of a society – and he views the phenomenon as a tool or weapon that harnesses those beliefs for some other, possibly darker, purpose. He writes (excerpt from the link above):

“When the underlying archetypes are extracted, the saucer myth is seen to coincide to a remarkable degree with the fairy-faith of Celtic countries … religious miracles… and the widespread belief among all peoples concerning entities whose physical and psychological descriptions place them in the same category as the present-day ufonauts.”

It isn’t until he published the Invisible College that he suggests Ufo researchers should actively interact with the “control system.” However, in this 1978 interview with FATE Magazine, Vallee makes it extremely clear what he believes the correct “test” approach should be when he responds to the interviewer’s question about abduction cases.

“An engineer observing a computer would want to look at the back and open up the boxes. He would want to take a probe and examine the different parts of the computer. But there is another way of looking at it; the way of the programmer, who wants to sit in front of the computer and analyze what it does, not how it does it. That’s my approach. I want to ask it questions and see what answers I get. I want to interact with it as an information entity.”

As an engineer myself, Vallee’s approach makes sense – however, it is surprisingly naive coming from such an intelligent man.  It makes the observer (us) wonder exactly how Vallee would attempt to “ask it questions” in order to watch the reaction of the “information entity”?  And going there, we must then ask the question, what would such “questions” look like to the folks who are simply observing the social reaction to the phenomenon?  How would those “questions to the control system” appear to public visitors on blogs, websites and forums? How would it appear to passers-by who are simply curious about a particular strange abduction case or UFO sighting? At what point do those “questions” become misinformation to the casual observer?  Or, to the scientists attempting to reverse-engineer this social informational control system – are casual observers simply collateral damage? Maybe they consider that their ultimate scientific agenda has a much higher purpose?

Was Vallee really considering, likely along with his scientist friends, actively “testing” the control system? In Vallee’s own words (remember, this was in 1978) – emphasis is mine:

“I’ve come up with the control system concept because it is an idea which can be tested. In that sense it’s much closer to a scientific hypotheses than the others.

There are different kinds of control systems – open ones and closed ones – and there are tests you can apply to them to find out what kind of control system you’re inside. That leads to a number of experiments you can do with the UFO phenomenon, whereas the other interpretations don’t lead you to anything.

The control system concept can be tested by a small group of people – you don’t need a large organization or a lot of equipment – and you can start thinking about active intervention in the phenomenon.”

Finally, after confusion by the interviewer, who asks him for more specifics, Vallee finally expands upon how exactly he wants to “test” the Ufology control system.

Vallee: I hesitate to be too specific. I’m speaking, as I’m sure you understand, of the attempted manipulation of UFO manifestations. It’s a pretty tall order. We’re assuming that there is a feedback mechanism involved in the operations of the control system; if you change the information that’s carried back to that system, you might be able to infiltrate it through its own feedback.”

Final Notes

The RU suggestion here is significant. We are proposing that a group of UFO researchers, in the 1970’s, formulated their own “attack plan” against the UFO phenomenon. Vallee published more books in the latter part of the 1970s that would elaborate upon what subject matter they would use and how they would test the system. We will show how these “scientific” tests conducted against the “control system” ultimately muddied the waters and destroyed the chance for legitimate study of the UFO phenomenon throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Shockingly, these scientists refuse to give up on their efforts, even today.



Filed under: Uncategorized — RyanDube @ 6:01 pm




July 2, 2009

Do Aliens Exist?


earth2 Do Aliens Exist? It’s a question man has asked for many years now. We’ve tried every means at our disposal to ascertain whether we are alone in the universe. We’ve sent messages across the vast expanse of space (our TV and radio transmissions) and searched the many radio waves for anomalies that would indicate advanced peoples.

Frank Drake, in the early 1960s, came up with an equation (called the “Drake Equation”) that calculated the possibility of extraterrestrial life.

 

drakes4

 

Astronomer David Darling argues in Life Everywhere (2001)  that life is highly likely to be common but also says we lack the knowledge to definitively conclude that it is likely to be uncommon. Keep in mind that our sun is hardly a “typical star” as 95% of stars are less massive.

He determined that there was a possibility of 100,000 to 1,000,000 extraterrestrial civilizations in our galaxy (the Milky Way) alone.

Is Life Elsewhere Impossible?

On the other side of the “Do Aliens Exist?” question is the rare earth hypothesis. In the 1995 book, The Creator and the Cosmos, physicist Hugh Ross lists 33 characteristics a planet must have to support life. He estimates the probability of such a combination to be found in the universe as “much less than one in a million trillion.”

In their 2004 book, The Privileged Planet, astronomer Guillermo Gonzalez and theologian Jay Richards carry the notion further, asserting that our place in the cosmos is not only special but also designed for discovery.

UFO and Alien Witness Accounts

Some people swear they have proof of the existance of alien beings yet it is lacking since it is merely words with no direct physical evidence. Take this witnesss account from UFO Alley for example:

“With equal certainty I can tell you they are here and have been for some time. I personally have only been involved directly for just over two years now. My wife and I witnessed a incoming “Disabled UFO.”

It is still quite near, actually 9 kilometers from where I am writing. It is disabled and not leaving. It is split and lifeforms of some type are exiting the craft. They have been for two years.

I have said that mankind has little to do with this climate change. Our Alien arrivals are filling the skies with their UFOs and themselves. Warming the atmosphere. Climate change will be far more rapid than anticipated.”

 The skeptics argue that the evidence is less than convincing, since most UFO sightings (95%) can be explained by natural phenomenon. Some even go so far as to question the witness’s reliabilty.

Michael Shermer, the editor of Skeptic Magazine, says, “The parade of astronauts or police officers or politicians like Jimmy Carter  it’s irrelevant. Because they’re human and their brains and nervous systems and sensory apparatus are structured just like the average Joe’s.”

Also consider the people who claim to have physical proof of alien visitation, such as this witness account from iReport:
 
“What I’m showing in this video is an actual fragment of a UFO which crashed near Muncie Indiana in 1988. It was recovered by a dear friend of mine who is much older than me. He worked on a project in the 1990’s which was funded by DARPA. He recovered the fragment in 1989 when a friend of his who was a FEMA agent brought him to the site.”

These are not to be confused with the many abduction stories. And until sleep paralysis can be positively ruled out they hold no hope of solving the puzzle.

Do Aliens Exist – The Public Perception

In a recent poll conducted by quizilla.com on whether people think there are other civilizations in the universe the results speak for themselves.

– Nope. Never existed and never will. -> 9% (141)
– Of course they exist. They even come to Earth! -> 22% (342)
– Only in the movies. -> 8% (131)
– Maybe somewhere in the universe but not anywhere near Earth. -> 59% (891)

So do aliens exist? SETI is actively sweeping the known radio frequencies for signs of intelligent communication. They are sifting through the cosmic noise for a distinct signal. Except for a couple of anomolous signals (the WOW finding for example) they have yet to find any verifiable signs that anyone is sending us signals. Their search is a huge dragnet meant to turn up a needle in a haystack.

And when/if we do find some other civilization – what then? Maybe as Dr. Michio Kaku said in Physics of the Impossible (2008) P. 147: 

“But a Type III civilization would likely not be inclined to visit us or conquer us, as in the movie Independence Day, where such a civilization spreads like a plague of locusts, swarming around planets to suck their resources dry. In reality, there are countless dead planets in outer space with vast mineral wealth they could harvest without the nuisance of coping with a restive native population. Their attitude toward us might resemble our own attitude toward an ant hill. Our inclination is not to bend down and offer the ants beads and trinkets, but simply to ignore them.”

In all likelyhood, it would seem a good bet that we are not alone in the vast universe, but trying to prove it is a task that could occupy our many years to come.  And man, by his very nature, will continue to search the vast heavens for signs of life. But until we drop our homo-centric pretexts and open our thinking to the many possibilities that might exist in the universe, we may just be spinning our wheels. After all, who knows that they haven’t already been here, yet we let our myopic view get in the way.

Share your comments or opinions in the comments area below, or discuss this article and whether you believe aliens exist in the RU forums.



Filed under: ET,UFOs,Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — Keith @ 4:42 pm




January 10, 2009

Bruce Maccabee Glimpses Behind the Curtain


Bruce Maccabee

Weird and wild things have certainly been going on in the skies and space around the planet earth.  Throughout the history of the human race, strange celestial events have captured and mesmerized the beings called Earthlings who live on this little blue marble, hurtling through space.

These sightings are nothing new.  In fact, you can find reference to odd sightings in the sky all the way back to earliest recorded history.  For America, there was some fascination regarding objects in the sky with the foo-fighters that American pilots spotted over the skies of Germany throughout the 1940s.  As military aircraft advanced and more classified flight testing started taking place over the skies of America, an entire subculture started to form – filled with enthusiasts, hobbyists, sky-watchers and researchers who were mesmerized by the odd crafts and other objects occasionally spotted in the skies above them.

Ufologists have written volumes on the activities of the Air Force throughout the 1950s and beyond, with the opening and closing of Project Blue Book, the controversy of the Condon Report, and the many other insanities and confusion that litters Ufological history like battered bodies on a battlefield.  In many ways, it was a virtual war between civilian researchers who wanted answers, and a military that refused to talk about the subject – or when it did, answers were unsatisfactory, patronizing, and at times ridiculous.

In this update, we will focus on one particular soldier, of sorts, and one specific battle within a much larger and broad Ufology war.  This small skirmish provides tremendous clues regarding what came next, and subsequent events over the remaining 30+ years.

Regular UFO Private Gets a Promotion

For those who don’t know Bruce Maccabee, or his background within Ufology, click this link for a brief overview.  During the particular moment in time examined in this article, Bruce Maccabee was hard at work investigating one of the latest breaking reports of UFO sightings in New Zealand.

New Zealand 1978 UFO

New Zealand 1978 UFO

These UFO sightings were no different than many others before or after, except for the fact that so much was captured on videotape, because an actual news crew was present for the sighting.  According to Maccabee’s report on the sighting, reporter Quentin Fogarty, from a TV station in Melbourne, Australia, was traveling with his film crew to obtain some news story film footage about a previous sighting from just two weeks earlier – just off the coast of New Zealand.

Ironically, the most amazing footage of a UFO sighting came from a film crew that had the intention to learn more about the previous sighting – they never thought they would see anything spectacular themselves.

The three-man news team spotted the strange object with flashing lights around 2:45 and 2:55 in the morning, while on the airplane headed toward New Zealand.  The pilot and copilot were also witness to the strange craft.  Additionally, the Wellington Air Traffic Control radar captured and recorded the radar target where the visual sighting took place.  Geoffrey Causer was the air traffic controller who witnessed the radar detection.

Upon landing – these second sightings went public on the Australian TV station, and hit the news media worldwide.  In 1979, Bruce Maccabee traveled to New Zealand to investigate.  Upon returning, Maccabee used his Navy contacts to obtain audience with the CIA.

According to the “Associated Investigators Group,” their report regarding Maccabee’s activities during that time states:

“Maccabee first approached the CIA in early 1979 after traveling to New Zealand to investigate the filming of an alleged ‘UFO’ from a plane by a television crew. Although most people who viewed the film were unimpressed by the jumpy blob of nocturnal light, Maccabee for unclear reasons decided the film represented some sort of probative evidence of UFOs and set out to bring it to the attention of CIA officials. He then put out feelers through his contacts with companies performing tasks for the CIA, and later a meeting was set up at CIA Headquarters, during which he screened the film and summarized his analysis of it.”

Bruce Maccabee and Dr. Christopher “Kit” Green Meet for the First Time

It was at that meeting, in 1979, where Maccabee provided a full briefing for the CIA regarding the strange lights, that Maccabee reported Dr. Kit Green pulled him aside after the video and introduced himself as the custodian of the CIA’s UFO files.

With a tendency to make exaggerated, sweeping statements without additional explanation, Dr. Green told Bruce that those files consisted of about 15,000 UFO related documents, of which “only two or three thousand were really interesting.”  This off-the-cuff comment would come back to bite Dr. Green, as the CIA Freedom of Information Staff were busy responding to a FOIA suit that researcher Tod Zechel of the CAUS had filed.  CAUS researchers, after hearing about this comment from Bruce, were furious that Dr. Green hadn’t provided all of the “15,000” UFO documents.  The fact that any documents, at all, were lacking angered researchers who suspected the CIA was trying to “cover up” UFO secrets.

In 2006, Dr. Green reported to Reality Uncovered researchers that the majority of the documents were nothing more than garbage – like newspaper or magazine clippings some UFO nut had sent in as a “UFO report.”  In other cases they were useless data from the Foreign Broadcast Services.

Ufology Integrates with Parapsychology

Bruce MaccabeeIn an interview published in the article “The UFO/FBI Connection,” Maccabee makes reference to this meeting with Kit Green, in 1979, when he states, “…what it amounted to was that I gave them a lot of information and they gave me nothing.”

Later in the above interview, Maccabee makes note of the odd correlation that was taking place within the community of government researchers and scientists who were following various paranormal phenomenon when he comments on their strange overlapping interests into the UFO phenomenon and parapsychology.

“The Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) was also involved in funding remote viewing.  There was an intersection between remote viewing and UFO’s…  [snip] …And Ingo drew a UFO behind a submarine in one of his remote viewings.  That’s the kind of intersection I’m talking about.”

Click here for more information about Ingo’s drawing of a UFO.

Since 1995, the American Public has been aware of the remote viewing research where the government contracted out parapsychology research at SRI, directed by Hal Puthoff.  As reported here, in 1979, the CIA was already neck deep in “weird” research regarding parapsychology.  According to Maccabee, the potential reality of psychic functioning was triggering a domino effect throughout government research communities who were already developing a belief in metal bending, psychokinesis, and remote viewing.  Maccabee continues:

“When I talked with Kit Green in 1979, he was aware of all this, too, but he wouldn’t tell me anything.  He would only suck up information from me regarding the UFO aspect.  But there was this intersection point where psychics started zeroing in on UFOs and the people in the paranormal side were saying, ‘This can’t be. UFO’s aren’t real.’  So they had to start investigating what was going on in the UFO community.”

The Ripple Effect Among “Believer” Government Scientists

Up until 1979, Kit Green was one of the CIA officials tasked with monitoring and reporting on SRI remote viewing research.  By this point, Hal Puthoff and Kit Green were not only colleagues in research, but were already friends.  This was also the year that tasking and funding for Remote Viewing research transitioned to the DIA and widened in scope as one source (among many) of “intelligence data collection.”

However, what Maccabee’s experience in dealing with the CIA during this time tells us is that the folks who were already interested in parapsychology at this time, were suddenly turning toward Ufology as an additional subject of research and study.

It’s important to note that, up until this point, Roswell was very low on the scale of interest for UFO researchers.  Many people interested in the UFO sightings of the time, had little interest in events that took place at Roswell many years before.

CIA Reviews The New MJ-12 Revelations

MJ12 DocumentBefore leaving the subject of Bruce Maccabee, there is one minor additional issue to note.  According to the AIG report on Maccabee’s CIA interactions, Maccabee admitted that, in the mid 1980’s, he attended one “standing room only” meeting in a CIA conference room in which he was asked to brief CIA personnel on the “MJ-12” group that was detailed in the documents revealed by researcher and author William “Bill” Moore.

According to the AIG report, Maccabee admitted that after the conference, Ron Pandolfi, the CIA official who had replaced Kit Green at the agency, told Maccabee that the MJ-12 briefing triggered an aftermath of CIA officers snooping on each other to determine whether any of the current staff were members of the “fabled UFO control group.”

Of note here is the fact that the topic of discussion for Ufologists, in 1979, were UFO sightings and researching the source of these odd objects in the skies.  Subsequent to 1979, and throughout the next three decades, documents started getting “leaked” that outlined a conspiracy and a core story, the likes of which no Ufologist could have ever predicted or expected.

Since then, many of those documents have been revealed as obvious hoaxes, including by the FBI.  More recent attempts, as late as 2005, to distribute the same story via email and by website in the form of the “Serpo” story, were also exposed as coming from Rick Doty, the same person exposed earlier as the distributor many of the earlier MJ-12 documents.  Regardless of the fact that some MJ-12 documents have been discredited as hoaxed, many Ufologists continue to believe that there’s at least an ounce of truth buried in those documents.

The difference in the 2005 case, however, is that this time Dr. Christopher Green and Harold Puthoff were clearly proven as being closely involved with the individuals who were releasing that story to the public.  Bob Collins book “Exempt From Disclosure,” also reveals their involvement during the 1980’s distribution of the MJ-12 documents.  Statements from Ron Pandolfi also confirm that involvement throughout the 80’s and today.

Upcoming reports will outline the nature and process of those releases starting in the late 1970s, as well as the purpose and meaning behind what is now known as the “Core Story.”

Sources:

“Who’s Disinforming Who?” by the Associated Investigators Group
http://paul.rutgers.edu/~mcgrew/ufo/cia.research

Dr. Bruce Maccabee Research Website
http://brumac.8k.com/

The UFO/FBI Connection, Llewellyn Publications









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