February 1, 2009

How Scientologists Created a Cult of the U.S. Government


Swat TeamIn July of 1977, the FBI conducted three early-morning raids of Scientology Guardian Office facilities (the Guardian Office was Hubbard’s Intelligence agency).  Senior GO personnel were sent to jail as a result, and the GO was disestablished afterwards.  Prior to this raid, there was a virtual intelligence war between the cult of Scientologists and U.S. government agencies.  Scientologists dedicated an inordinate amount of resources and time to infiltrating U.S. agencies – even by simply using low-level positions in order to “convert” others within the agency over to Scientology.  L Ron Hubbard’s ultimate goal was to obtain whatever Scientology related documents existed within various government organizations.  L Ron Hubbard had filed countless FOIA lawsuits leading up to that critical point when the FBI raid took place. With these raids, the U.S. intelligence complex dealt Scientology a deadly blow.

The U.S. Government Gets Infected

Meanwhile, due to the volumes of documents released many years later in the 1990s, the public now knows that at the time of these raids, in the 1970’s, the CIA was not averse to using Scientology auditing “technology” through the employment of high-level Scientology OTs.  Keep in mind, these were guys where active members of a cult that was actively taking part in Intelligence warfare with the CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies.  Yet the top three guys running the SRI-CIA contract were, all three, high level Scientologists.  One of whom, Hal Puthoff, had such a close relationship with L Ron Hubbard that he even wrote the preface for one of his books.  Ingo Swan, who essentially was the one who developed the “remote-viewing” techniques, used the cult of Scientology methodologies that he’d obtained from high-level Scientology documents that, at the time, were well-protected by the Guardian Office.  At the point of these raids, these scientologists had already begun training CIA personnel in using these “methodologies,” or auditing procedures, which some have described as a form of hypnosis, or brain-washing.

The CIA allowed these three Scientologists to spread this belief system created by the cult of Scientology, and allowed them to infect other personnel within the agency with this doctrine and these practices.  These personnel in turn, as well as Swann himself, spread these techniques to other agencies as well as the military, such as the research and operations conducted at INSCOM, Fort Meade.  A religion was born…except our government could legally practice it.  At the point of these raids, the IRS had conveniently official removed its tax-exempt status.  This meant that as far as the U.S. Federal Government was concerned, Scientology was not a “religion.”  This removed the government from its obligations to respect and maintain a “hands-off” approach regarding religious beliefs.  With the cult of Scientology no longer officially classified as a religion, the government was free to do as it wanted, and it proceeded to treat the organization as an Intelligence threat.  Its secrets, once finally obtained from the GO raid, could be utilized in the “best interests” of the United States.  If the claimed abilities allegedly generated by auditing procedures were shown to be effective – the government would have yet another weapon in its massive military-industrial arsenal.

Little did the CIA know that they had just allowed an infectious virus into their inner sactum.

The Spread of the Remote Viewing/Auditing Viral Meme

Many of those running the anti-Scientology intelligence campaign, as of the early to mid 70’s, may not have realized the kind of organization they were dealing with.  And they may not have realized the inherent danger of the highest-level “technologies” which they were only just beginning to dabble with.  Viral memes, and the susceptibility of the human mind to the power of suggestion and hypnotic techniques, would prove to be catastrophic to those who were exposed to this training.

JanetIn a fascinating article by Janet Reitman in Rolling Stone magazine titled Inside Scientology – Unlocking the complex code of America’s most mysterious religion, she writes:

“Scientologists, much like Mormons or Christian evangelicals, consider themselves to be on a mission. They frequently speak of ‘helping people,’ and this mission is stressed in a number of church testaments. ‘Scientologists see themselves as possessors of doctrines and skills that can save the world, if not the galaxy,’ says Stephen Kent, a professor of sociology at the University of Alberta, in Canada, who has extensively studied the group.”

She quotes Hubbard himself as describing the cult of Scientology as follows:

“‘We’re not playing some minor game in Scientology,’ Hubbard wrote in a policy paper titled ‘Keeping Scientology Working,’ which is required reading for every member. ‘The whole agonized future of this planet, every man, woman and child on it, and your own destiny for the next endless trillions of years depend on what you do here and now with and in Scientology. This is a deadly serious activity.'”

She describes OT’s (Operating Thetans):

“OTs are Scientology’s elite — enlightened beings who are said to have total ‘control’ over themselves and their environment. OTs can allegedly move inanimate objects with their minds, leave their bodies at will and telepathically communicate with, and control the behavior of, both animals and human beings. At the highest levels, they are allegedly liberated from the physical universe, to the point where they can psychically control what Scientologists call MEST: Matter, Energy, Space and Time.”

OTIII is described by Janet as reaching the “Wall of Fire”:

“The most important, and highly anticipated, of the eight ‘OT levels’ is OT III, also known as the Wall of Fire. It is here that Scientologists are told the secrets of the universe, and, some believe, the creation story behind the entire religion. It is knowledge so dangerous, they are told, any Scientologist learning this material before he is ready could die. When I ask Mike Rinder about this, he casts the warning in less-dire terms, explaining that, before he reached OT III — he is now OT V — he was told that looking at the material early was ‘spiritually not good for you.’ But Hubbard, who told followers that he discovered these secrets while on a trip to North Africa in 1967, was more dramatic. ‘Somehow or other I brought it off, and obtained the material and was able to live through it,’ he wrote. ‘I am very sure that I was the first one that ever did live through any attempt to attain that material.’ Scientologists must be ‘invited’ to do OT III. Beforehand, they are put through an intensive auditing process to verify that they are ready. They sign a waiver promising never to reveal the secrets of OT III, nor to hold Scientology responsible for any trauma or damage one might endure at this stage of auditing. Finally, they are given a manila folder, which they must read in a private, locked room.”

A Story That Can Make You Sick

RinderImagine – a story so terribly dangerous to an unprepared human mind, that it could actually make a person who was previously mentally healthy, very sick.  A poisonous viral meme, if you will.  A story that could make a previously healthy person very sick, sick, sick.  Sound familiar?

The story described above, published by a former member in 1995, shows a darker side to the cult of Scientology, both anti-Christian and anti-God, disavowing organized religion entirely – and replacing it with a cosmological belief system based on an alien story.  Auditing, essentially, is a brainwashing technique to gradually strip away any previous religious beliefs or inclinations to logically and critically think about ideas and new concepts.  It’s a method to remove resistance to illogical new ideas, building up to the point when the final revelation of the true nature of Scientology is revealed.  At this point, OTIII, the Scientologist’s mind is so emptied and robotic, and so “clear” that this story fills the void and becomes “truth”.

When Janet asks Scientology leader Mike Rinder, the fifty-year-old director of the Church of Scientology International’s legal and public-relations wing known as the Office of Special Affairs, about these kinds of science fiction stories at the heart of Scientology – he responds heatedly: “I’m not explaining it to you, and I could not explain it to you,” says Rinder heatedly. “You don’t have a hope of understanding it.”

It must be very complicated.  Sort of like the “New Physics” we heard about during the Project Serpo fiasco.  Scientology is known among its members as the “New Science” after all.



Filed under: Remote Viewing,Serpo — Tags: , , , — RyanDube @ 6:56 am






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