History of Remote Viewing

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History of Remote Viewing

Postby Zep Tepi » Sun Dec 17, 2006 5:19 am

We are pleased to announce the first in a series of articles by Mike Jamieson, the well known researcher and former MUFON state section director for Napa County in California. Mike is a valued member of the REALITY uncovered forums and this article is the first in a series of many that we have planned for the future.

A History of Remote Viewing - Part One
The first part sees Mike taking us through the intriguing world of Remote Viewing and the origins of the term, including a look at the first experiments conducted with Ingo Swann.

Read all about it here

Enjoy :)

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Postby MikeJamieson » Sun Dec 17, 2006 3:34 pm

I got a correction in this line:

"Despite some interesting early successes, Swann found the initial stretch (of a 7 month period) "

That "of a 7 month period" should be instead "several weeks".
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Postby Zep Tepi » Sun Dec 17, 2006 5:12 pm

Doh! Sorry about that Mike, I know you mentioned it a couple of times already. It has now been corrected.

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Postby Serpentime » Tue Dec 19, 2006 5:50 am

Thanks, Mike.

That was a great article. :) I really enjoyed it -- particularly the information about the effects of consciousness on organic matter.

Nice work. :)


Looking forward to Part Two,

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Postby MikeJamieson » Tue Dec 19, 2006 11:01 am

Thanks, Serpentine. Part two is going to involve many more "voices"
(in addition to the primary voice of Swann in part one). Including Hal
Puthoff's and Kit Green's, folks well known here at RU.

BTW, have you heard of Robert Jahn's work at Princeton University?
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Postby Shawnna » Thu Dec 21, 2006 7:14 am

Since I do not believe in coincidence, I won't say "What a coincidence!" but.....

Here's a snippet from a book I'm reading related to this.

When the science editor of Time magazine - Leon Jaroff - became aware of the remove-viewing experiments taking place at SRI under Puthoff and Targ, he was alarmed. To Jaroff, the paranormal research at SRI was akin to the occultism that, in his view, gave rise to fascism in Germany, and he felt that their research should be destroyed. Theodore Adorno (1903-1969), German philosopher whose "F-scale" or "fascism scale" became a controversial subject in psychological circles after his expulsion from Germany in 1934, attacked the "irrational" for the very same reason; his belief that the irrational (to Adorno, everything from astrology to occultism) in mass culture inevitably leads to facism. One is almost forced to ask the obvious question, the one not asked in polite company: does the "irrational" include religion? Of course it does, but science prefers religion to be a vehicle for instruction in ethical culture, and not supernaturalism; yet it is humanity's confrontation with the supernatural that lead to the development of religion and, eventually, ethics and moral values.

Therefore, it is perhaps not the belief in the irrational that leads to fascism, however, but to the marginalization of the irrational that does so, for it encourages a parallel belief in conspiracy. Since people in general have direct experience of the paranormal in their lives -- from events as trivial as coincidence to as traumatic as poltergeist activity, incidents of ESP, UFO sightings, or even remote viewing -- to find their experience ridiculed by the established authority is insupportable. They confront this "disconnect" coming to them from authority, and thus begin to question authority- it's wisdom, or its motives--itself. They become prey to those who would encourage their "irrational" beliefs and point an accusing finger at the very authorities -- scientific or political-- who would deny them the secret power or arcane knowledge they could otherwise possess. The debasement of the paranormal in culture only serves to increase its value among the population, who treasure their unusual experiences in secret, and who build up entire cosmologies around them, since they have no other context in which to understand what they know to have occurred. Thus, for me, fascism is the result not of irrational beliefs but of the monopolization of those beliefs by others; men and women who exploit the divide between the direct experience of the masses and the intellectualist denial of their experiences by a privileged, powerful elite.


From Sinister Forces - book 3; pg 361-362
"The only thing we found that makes the emptiness bearable is................... each other."

From the movie "Contact"

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Postby Zep Tepi » Wed Aug 08, 2007 11:49 pm

Part 2 of Mike's excellent report has been released and is available to view from the RU Homepage

Great work Mike :)

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Postby Center Lane » Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:23 pm

Greetings!

I'm rather new to this board, so I request your forbearance.

However, as a researcher in the subject of Remote Viewing, myself. I would first like to say that I thought Mike Jamieson's article was a very succinct and concise History of the subject.

That said there is another interesting aspects of this subject that should be mentioned and that is that Swann, Puthoff and Price were all adepts of the Church of Scientology.

This connection is covered in the following article posted on FAS' website:

http://www.fas.org/irp/program/collect/stargate.htm

The applicable quote :

The initial research program, called SCANATE [scan by coordinate] was funded by CIA beginning in 1970. Remote viewing research began in 1972 at the Stanford Research Institute [SRI] in Menlo Park, CA. This work was conducted by Russell Targ and Harold Puthoff, once with the NSA and at the time a Scientologist. The effort initially focused on a few "gifted individuals" such as New York artist Ingo Swann, an OT Level VII Scientologist. Many of the SRI "empaths" were from the Church of Scientology. Individuals who appeared to show potential were trained and taught to use talents for "psychic warfare." The minimum accuracy needed by the clients was said to be 65%, and proponents claim that in the later stages of the training effort, this accuracy level was "often consistently exceeded."


I know bringing up someone's religious believes could be considered controversial, but I feel it is a very important aspect.

Any comments?
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Postby ryguy » Sat Feb 23, 2008 1:38 am

Center Lane wrote:Greetings!

I'm rather new to this board, so I request your forbearance.

However, as a researcher in the subject of Remote Viewing, myself. I would first like to say that I thought Mike Jamieson's article was a very succinct and concise History of the subject.


Welcome! I'm always honored to have any researcher in the field of Remote Viewing join us. So it says a lot and I'm glad to see you here - thanks for coming to RU.

I know bringing up someone's religious believes could be considered controversial, but I feel it is a very important aspect.

Any comments?


It would be inappropriate possibly, if we weren't talking about a "religion" that was also incorporated into professional and personal activities that drew a fair amount of taxpayer money. I'd say that makes it quite an important aspect.

So I agree with you - and there's a great deal of data out there that supports the contention that Scientology played a large part in the research and the relative "successes" and "failures" that were allegedly achieved...

One of the greatest summary pieces I've personally seen on the topic was Ken Kress' analysis Parapsychology In Intelligence: A Personal Review and Conclusions

In it...he reflects on the fact that the GO (Scientology Intelligence Service) had been actively attempting to infiltrate government agencies - and the FBI raid on the GO led to quite a revelation concerning SRI's Scientologist and Remote Viewing "hero", Mr. Pat Price:

Consider the second assertion that the motives of psychics clashed wi th
mine and taught me, too late, to be very wary of psychics. In the late 1970s,
several years after the project was terminated, I got a secure line call from a
person who identified himself as an FBI agent. He suggested that I should be
prepared for a spate of publicity about the remote viewings of Pat Price. Pat
had died a few years before and I was surprised that somebody had leaked information about these defunct activities.

The FBI agent proceeded to explain that Pat Price was a member of an organization that was recently raided for documents indicative of illegal activity.
The organization was vigorously resisting the government investigation but the raid produced hundreds of files and papers that supported the government’s
allegations. These documents were now in the public domain as part of the discovery process in the legal proceedings.

One such file included debriefings of Pat Price about his CIA remote viewing
projects. The debriefings were a detailed record of the intelligence objectives I had given Pat and results that Pat provided to me. The files revealed the
meeting places as well as all the names of those present. My esteem instantly
rose for my colleagues who had used first names only with all meetings with
Pat! As the file made clear, Pat, who had signed an official secrecy agreement, would immediately go to his superior in the organization after sessions with me and divulge everything. As far as I know, the documents were never read by anybody who publicized them and the organization never used them.


Pat Price... ignoring his secrecy oathe to the U.S. Government and spying for Scientology. And that's only one case that we now know about....can't help but wonder what the *other* Scientologists were up to?

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Postby Center Lane » Sun Feb 24, 2008 2:45 am

ryguy wrote:Welcome! I'm always honored to have any researcher in the field of Remote Viewing join us. So it says a lot and I'm glad to see you here - thanks for coming to RU.


Thanks :)

ryguy wrote:It would be inappropriate possibly, if we weren't talking about a "religion" that was also incorporated into professional and personal activities that drew a fair amount of taxpayer money. I'd say that makes it quite an important aspect.

So I agree with you - and there's a great deal of data out there that supports the contention that Scientology played a large part in the research and the relative "successes" and "failures" that were allegedly achieved...

One of the greatest summary pieces I've personally seen on the topic was Ken Kress' analysis Parapsychology In Intelligence: A Personal Review and Conclusions

In it...he reflects on the fact that the GO (Scientology Intelligence Service) had been actively attempting to infiltrate government agencies - and the FBI raid on the GO led to quite a revelation concerning SRI's Scientologist and Remote Viewing "hero", Mr. Pat Price:


Yes I remember that article originally written for CSI and the above addendum included later when it was declassified and published in JSE.

ryguy wrote:
Consider the second assertion that the motives of psychics clashed withmine and taught me, too late, to be very wary of psychics. In the late 1970s,several years after the project was terminated, I got a secure line call from aperson who identified himself as an FBI agent. He suggested that I should beprepared for a spate of publicity about the remote viewings of Pat Price. Pathad died a few years before and I was surprised that somebody had leaked information about these defunct activities.

The FBI agent proceeded to explain that Pat Price was a member of an organization that was recently raided for documents indicative of illegal activity.
The organization was vigorously resisting the government investigation but the raid produced hundreds of files and papers that supported the government’s
allegations. These documents were now in the public domain as part of the discovery process in the legal proceedings.

One such file included debriefings of Pat Price about his CIA remote viewing
projects. The debriefings were a detailed record of the intelligence objectives I had given Pat and results that Pat provided to me. The files revealed the
meeting places as well as all the names of those present. My esteem instantly
rose for my colleagues who had used first names only with all meetings with
Pat! As the file made clear, Pat, who had signed an official secrecy agreement, would immediately go to his superior in the organization after sessions with me and divulge everything. As far as I know, the documents were never read by anybody who publicized them and the organization never used them.


Pat Price... ignoring his secrecy oathe to the U.S. Government and spying for Scientology. And that's only one case that we now know about....can't help but wonder what the *other* Scientologists were up to?


True, but we see that Philip Agee also violated this secrecy oath as well, when confronted with a possible act of conscience when he wrote Inside the Company.

Same with Victor Marchetti when he cowrote with John Marks , who wrote about the CIA's Search for a Manchurian Candidate also known by various cryptonyms as Bluebird, Artichoke, Mk Ultra, Naomi, Delta, Search, etc, The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence and others who have blown the whistle on the machinations of what the Pike Committee called "a rogue elephant".

Let us also not forget as well that the CIA was also involved in Domestic Spying operations as well in violation of their Charter and the National Security Act of 1947 which has since been released in "The Family Jewels".

CIA Releases Secret 'Family Jewels'

My point is that there are always two sides to every issue.

Also what I've noted in the case of most researchers of the CIA's involvement in psychic phenomena is failure to note that the CIA's involvement began long before the book by Ostrander and Schroeder in fact since 1952.

This is even mentioned by Kress in the article you just posted in part.

http://www.scientificexploration.org/js ... _kress.pdf

Anecdotal reports of extrasensory perception (ESP) capabilities have
reached U.S. national security agencies at least since World War II, when
Hitler was said to rely on astrologers and seers. Suggestions for military applicationsof ESP continued to be received after World War II. For example, in1952 the Department of Defense was lectured on the possible usef u l n ess of extrasensory pe rception in psychological warf a re [1]. Over the years, re p o rt sc o n t in u ed to accumulate. In 1961, the re p o rts in d u c ed one of the earliest U.S.g ove rnment parapsychology in vestigations when the chi ef of CIA’s Off ice ofTe c h n ical Serv ice (then the Te c h n ical Serv ic es Division) became in t e rest ed in the claims of ESP. Te c h n ical project off ic e rs soon contacted Stephen I.Abrams, the Director of the Parapsycholo g ical Laboratory, Oxford University, England. Under the auspic es of Project ULTRA, Abrams prepared a review art icle which claimed ESP was demonstrated but not understood or controllable [2]. The report was read with interest but produced no further action for another decade.


"Ultra" of course is a reference to the notorious Mk Ultra specifically Mk Ultra Subproject 136 which states its objectives are as follows:

³1. The purpose of this project is to support the research of (name redacted) an ³Experimental Analysis of Extrasensory Perception². A proposal describing his research activities is attached.

³2. (Name redacted) research effort is moving beyond the question of whether the phenomenon, extrasensory perception (ESP) exists. He is attempting to approach the twin question of what the functional relationship between other personality factors and ESP skills , and what are the factors that must be considered in using ESP as a method of communication. Any positive results along these lines would have an obvious utility for the Agency (Emphasis mine)(13).²


The declassified document can be accessed here:

http://stargate.collection.free.fr/PDFs ... ect136.pdf

and is part of the Stargate Collection.

However, i digress, since my point is that the CIA's Psychic research program didn't gain much ground until a group of Scientologists, became directly involved, which seems to bear out by actual research.

So was it because these people where naturally gifted psychics, who just happened to be Scientologists? or was it Scientology that gave them that ability? or as some have suggested was it an elaborate hoax that was perpetrated over twenty years at the cost of millions of dollars?

***Mod Edit: fixed quote and link***
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Postby ryguy » Sun Feb 24, 2008 5:45 am

Center Lane wrote:However, i digress, since my point is that the CIA's Psychic research program didn't gain much ground until a group of Scientologists, became directly involved, which seems to bear out by actual research.


Absolutely - I'd have to agree with that statement 100%.

So was it because these people where naturally gifted psychics, who just happened to be Scientologists? or was it Scientology that gave them that ability? or as some have suggested was it an elaborate hoax that was perpetrated over twenty years at the cost of millions of dollars?


Correct me if I'm wrong...but the way I understand the question you're asking is: Why did the Psychic research begin to build up steam at this point, once these Scientologists became involved...

I think that the man who was most involved at least in the CIA's work, and would have the best answer to that question, describes it the best in his report that both you and I have quoted from. I'd like to quote again, from my favorite part (I've added emphasis to the most relevant points that pertain to your question above):

S ince the passage of time allows the release of more historical information
about the CIA’s involvement in parapsychological research, I offer a few additional remarks and details not included in the original art icle. Two new assertions are offered from my experiences. First, intelligence often deals with initially unevaluated information sources that eventually may be proven highly important. This modus operandi makes intelligence services intrinsically susceptible to the seductive claims of psychics. Second, complicating an already difficult evaluation of alleged psychic abilities, some of the most interesting practitioners had personal objectives quite different than scientific discovery or national security.

[snip]

Because of the continuing desire to solve intractable problems, the Intelligence Community is always vulnerable to offers of help on the most
difficult issues.
There was an additional impetus in the 1970s when it was
known that the Soviet government was support ing the evaluation and development of paranormal phenomena. These forces conspired to cause me to be assigned to evaluate these and similar claims. The promise was too high and the cost too low not to look.

I attempted both a rigorous, science-based and pragmatic utility-oriented
investigation of parapsychology for the CIA, spurred by the need to solve hard
problems and some latent concern that the U. S. was overlooking something
important. While on this quest, I did observe one effect I wish to highlight now.
It was a demonstrable fact that psychics could convince professional intelligence operators of the genuineness of their powers.

One example was a remote viewing by Pat Price of an official foreign facility
which we were sure had only been seen by a select group of our people. Pat
provided overwhelming detail about the interior layout and design to an experienced operations officer, "Frank. " While watching the session between Pat and Frank, it was clear that it was fraught with the potential for elicitation. Frank and Pat chatted like two old men discussing remembrances of their long ago, boyhood school days. Pat would say he liked the subdued red and green decor surrounding the stairs and Frank would respond that he also was impressed with the lavish use of Italian marble. After several hours of such exchanges, Frank provided me with a very positive instant verbal assessment and soon followed up with a written, positive evaluation. Frank was sure that Pat was either there or could remotely, mentally access the facility. My conclusion was that the data did little to elucidate psychic powers but it was clear we could use Pat to convince some experienced operators that his powers were real. This seemed like a vulnerability result worth knowing.



And finally....his brilliant conclusion, where he notes his personal stance on the "reality" of psychic ability - and a lingering hint, for the rest of us, to keep in mind that the real question isn't so much the potential of whether psychic ability is real....but the vulnerability that is inherent when people are convinced to believe that a person's psychic ability is real.

The times demanded a measured investigation that I helped to organize and manage. Others followed the CIA program with results that I will leave to history to judge. Me, I remain a skeptical agnostic. More skeptical as time advances, but careful to note that even if paranormal phenomena are entirely bogus, some individuals are surely able to instill the belief in unexplained capabilities. How they do this and what are the vulnerabilities to such enticements is worth knowing.


I think Kenneth answers the question, at least in general - that the ramp up of psychic research was related to:

(1) A perception and atmosphere of suspicion and paranoia that the Soviets were "on to something". The Soviets, of course, surely conducted a number of CI campaigns to feed that conviction and convince U.S. Intel to sink research money and resources into the Psychic research.

(2) The Intelligence community was being offered assistance on this "problem" at least in part, from Russel Targ, who offered the assistance of SRI and the research of his friend Hal Puthoff.

(3) Several reports, including Hal/Targ's "Mind Reach", as well as Dale Graff's Warsaw threat analysis, instigated the ramping up of the research to the DIA / INSCOM around 1979.

(4) A pre-existing conviction by those doing the research - a foregone conclusion in their minds, that the ability was already real...they simply needed to determine it's potential uses. Their Scientology indoctrination convinced them that the galvanic response of the skin was a reflection of the alien "engrams"...and that elevating one's self to be "clear" would enable these abilities. These were pre-existing biases and conclusions - convictions already held by the "scientists" before they even entered the lab.

The above conditions led to the vulnerabilities that Kenneth describes...the vulnerability of Intel Organizations that arise when folks within that organization can be convinced by psychics of the "reality" of the psychic ability.

If you don't think scientists/researchers can be fooled into believing in non-existing psychic abilities - have a look at James Randi's Project Alpha, where he had two young magicians successfully fool Psychic Researchers into believing in their Psychic abilities.

That concept, that Kenneth points out above, is fascinating when you stop to think about it.

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Postby Center Lane » Sun Feb 24, 2008 9:25 am

I think Kenneth answers the question, at least in general - that the ramp up of psychic research was related to:

(1) A perception and atmosphere of suspicion and paranoia that the Soviets were "on to something". The Soviets, of course, surely conducted a number of CI campaigns to feed that conviction and convince U.S. Intel to sink research money and resources into the Psychic research.


Possible.

However, this does not dispute the fact that the Soviets were seriously involved with psychic research and were investing more rubles per dollar spent and that serious research had been begun as far back as 1922

In February, 1922, Kazhinsky was invited to address the All-Russian Congress of the Association of Naturalists, a top scientific organization perhaps equivalent to the American Institutes of Mental health today. 
The topic of his lecture was HUMAN THOUGHT-ELECTRICITY, and he quickly published a book under the same title. Having been invited to address the All-Russian Congress, it would be clear that the Congress supported and funded Kazhensky's work, while his research thereafter apparently became classified.
By 1923, he had published his early findings in a book entitled THOUGHT TRANSFERENCE. This book attracted favorable attention among important brain researchers at the time.


http://www.angelfire.com/or/mctrl/ebon.htm




(2) The Intelligence community was being offered assistance on this "problem" at least in part, from Russel Targ, who offered the assistance of SRI and the research of his friend Hal Puthoff.


But the fact is as I've shown earlier by posting Mk Ultra Subproject 136 and the earlier portion of Kess' Article the CIA were already interested.

Targ and Puthoff did not have to twist Duckett's or anyone else's arm in the DS&T.



(3) Several reports, including Hal/Targ's "Mind Reach", as well as Dale Graff's Warsaw threat analysis, instigated the ramping up of the research to the DIA / INSCOM around 1979.


INSCOM had already jumped on the psychic band wagon long before these reports where even published under code name Gondola Wish.


(4) A pre-existing conviction by those doing the research - a foregone conclusion in their minds, that the ability was already real...they simply needed to determine it's potential uses. Their Scientology indoctrination convinced them that the galvanic response of the skin was a reflection of the alien "engrams"...and that elevating one's self to be "clear" would enable these abilities. These were pre-existing biases and conclusions - convictions already held by the "scientists" before they even entered the lab.


This is not uncommon in any line of research be it nuclear physics or psychic research to assume certain phenomenon exist.

What is called a theory.

The job of the scientist is to prove objectively that this theory is correct, despite religious convictions or lack of them.

Independent review by Jessica Utts a statistician at UC Davis concluded:

It is clear to this author that anomalous cognition is possible and has been demonstrated. This conclusion is not based on belief, but rather on commonly accepted scientific criteria. The phenomenon has been replicated in a number of forms across laboratories and cultures. The various experiments in which it has been observed have been different enough that if some subtle methodological problems can explain the results, then there would have to be a different explanation for each type of experiment, yet the impact would have to be similar across experiments and laboratories. If fraud were responsible, similarly, it would require an equivalent amount of fraud on the part of a large number of experimenters or an even larger number of subjects.


The full report can be found here:

http://www.stat.ucdavis.edu/~utts/air2.html

The above conditions led to the vulnerabilities that Kenneth describes...the vulnerability of Intel Organizations that arise when folks within that organization can be convinced by psychics of the "reality" of the psychic ability.

If you don't think scientists/researchers can be fooled into believing in non-existing psychic abilities - have a look at James Randi's Project Alpha, where he had two young magicians successfully fool Psychic Researchers into believing in their Psychic abilities.

That concept, that Kenneth points out above, is fascinating when you stop to think about it.

-Ry


Project Alpha wasn't actually the raving "success" the Amazing Randi would like others to believe it was.

The outcome of this research is suggestive of psychokinesis but inconclusive, due to its exploratory nature ... ordinary explanations exist for these effects, given the conditions under which they have been observed. Thus, although several events of interest have transpired, we do not claim that evidence conclusive of "psychic ability" has yet been demonstrated in our research. [Emphasis added]


According to the report quoted those involved, weren't too impressed with the Amazing Randi's cheap pallor tricks:

http://www.aiprinc.org/para-c05_Thalbourne_1995.pdf

His claim that he actually "fooled" serious psychic researchers is at best disingenuous and at worst an outright confabulation used to forward his biased and preconceived agenda of "debunking" all that is paranormal.

As far as I'm concerned Randi was a cheap hustler before he got into CSICOP and is still a cheap hustler and fraud just like his Million Challenge which according to this post is nothing but worthless bonds:

http://www.skepticalinvestigations.org/ ... llenge.htm

Which is probably the real reason why any one with actual psychic ability is avoiding it like the plague.

The fact is that the Remote Viewing program had a high degree of success despite Ken's later misgivings which he comments on prior to his addendum:

These proposals were quickly followed by a laboratory demonstration. A
man was found by Targ and Puthoff who apparently had psychokinetic abili-
ties. He was taken on a surprise visit to a super-conducting shielded magne-
tometer being used in quark (high energy particle) experiments by Dr. A. Heb-
bard of Stanford University Physics Department. The quark experiment
required that the magnetometer be as well shielded as technology would allow.
Nevertheless, when the subject placed his attention on the interior of the mag-
netometer, the output signal was visibly disturbed, indicating a change in the
internal magnetic field. Several other correlations of his mental efforts with
signal variations were observed. These variations in the magnetometer were
never seen before or after the visit. The event was summarized and transmitted
to the Agency in the form of a letter to an OSI analyst [3] and as discussions
with OTS and ORD officers.
The Office of Technical Services took the first action. With the approval of
the same manager who supported the ESP studies a decade previously, an OTS
project officer contracted for a demonstration with the previously mentioned
man for a few days in August, 1972. During this demonstration, the subject
was asked to describe objects hidden out of sight by the CIA personnel. The
subject did well. The descriptions were so startlingly accurate that the OTD
and ORD representatives suggested that the work be continued and expanded.
The same Director of OTS reviewed the data, approved another $2,500 work
order, and encouraged the development of a more complete research plan.


All the sales talk in the world is not going to convince a magnometer graph to alter its readings.

Then there is the other following interesting incident noted as well:

During the summer of 1973, SRI continued working informally with an OSI
officer on a remote viewing experiment which eventually stimulated more
CIA-sponsored investigations of parapsychology. The target was a vacation
property in the eastern United States. The experiment began with the passing
of nothing more than the geographic coordinates of the vacation property to
the SRI physicists who, in turn, passed them to the two subjects, one of whom
was Pat Price. No maps were permitted, and the subjects were asked to give an
immediate response of what they remotely viewed at these coordinates. The
subject came back with descriptions which were apparent misses. They both
talked about a military-like facility. Nevertheless, a striking correlation of the
two independent descriptions was noted. The correlation caused the OSI offi-
cer to drive to the site and investigate in more detail.
To the surprise of the OSI officer, he soon discovered a sensitive government
installation a few miles from the vacation property. This discovery led to a re-
quest to have Price provide information concerning the interior workings of
this particular site. All the data produced by the two subjects were reviewed in
CIA and the Agency concerned.
The evaluation was, as usual, mixed [7]. Pat Price, who had no military or intelligence background, provided a list of project titles associated with cur-
rent and past activities including one of extreme sensitivity. Also, the code-
name of the site was provided. Other information concerning the physical lay-
out of the site was accurate. Some information, such as the names of the
people at the site, proved incorrect.
These experiments took several months to be analyzed and reviewed within
the Agency. Now Mr. Colby was DCI, and the new directors of OTS and ORD
were favorably impressed by the data. In the fall of 1973, a Statement of Work
was outlined, and SRI was asked to proposeanother program. A jointly funded
ORD and OTS program was begun in February, 1974 [8]. The author again
was the Project Officer. The project proceeded on the premise that the phe-
nomena existed; the objective was to develop and utilize them.


So as you can see the initial results where very impressive and difficult to fake.

Therefore, though there may have been some fudging on the part of some the Remote Viewers in question as the following amusing incident indicates:

When the decision was made to make Price witting, I decided to test him.
My branch chief and I sat in a conference room while Targ and Puthoff brought
a smiling Pat Price into the room. I was introduced as the sponsor, and I imme-
diately asked Price if he knew me.
Yes.
Name?
Ken Kress.
Occupation?
Works for CIA.
Since I was then a covert employee, the response was meaningful. After
having Price sign a secrecy agreement, and some discussions, I confronted him
again. I rolled out a large version of Figure 1 and asked if he had viewed this
site.
Yes, of course!
Why didn’t you see the four derricks?
Wait, I’ll check.
Price closed his eyes, put on his glasses (he “sees” better that way) and in a
few seconds answered “I didn’t see them because they are not there any
more.” Since my data were three or four months old, there was no rejoinder to
the implied accusation that my data were not good. We proceeded and com-
pleted a voluminous data package.
In a few weeks, the latest URDF-3 reconnaissance was checked. Two der-
ricks were partially disassembled, but basically all four were visible. In gener-
al, most of Price’s data were wrong or could not be evaluated. He did, never-
theless, produce some amazing descriptions, like buildings then under construction, spherical tank sections, and the crane in Figures 1 and 2. Two an-
alysts, a photo interpreter at IAS [12] and a nuclear analyst at Los Alamos Sci-
entific Laboratories agreed that Price’s description of the crane was accurate;
the nuclear analyst wrote that “one: he, the subject, actually saw it through re-
mote viewing, or two: he was informed what to draw by someone knowledge-
able of URDF-3 [13].” But, again, since there was so much bad information
mixed in with the good, the overall result was not considered useful. As proof
of remote viewing, the data are at best inconclusive.


Note Kress does say despite Price's AOL to be generous or possible fabrications if one were more cynically inclined that:

He did, nevertheless, produce some amazing descriptions, like buildings then under construction, spherical tank sections, and the crane in Figures 1 and 2.


Therefore the fact still remains that there actual tangible results from the Remote Viewing program which can be confirmed by further study of the hundreds of thousands of documents available in the Stargate collection and can not be dismissed as merely being staged.

So it would be difficult to dismiss it as merely an elaborate hoax.
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Postby caryn » Sun Feb 24, 2008 12:28 pm

"Therefore the fact still remains that there actual tangible results from the Remote Viewing program which can be confirmed by further study of the hundreds of thousands of documents available in the Stargate collection and can not be dismissed as merely being staged.

So it would be difficult to dismiss it as merely an elaborate hoax."

I agree. In fact a research project was recently completed here in the UK at one of our universities with interesting results, which has gained considerable outside interest. A more extensive research program is being planned for the near future, as a result.
caryn
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Postby Zep Tepi » Sun Feb 24, 2008 9:33 pm

The UK Ministry of Defense made available a large number of pages related to their own research into Remote Viewing.

From: MOD Freedom of Information Remote Viewing
A study was undertaken in 2001-2002 to investigate theories about capabilities to gather information remotely about what people may be seeing and to determine the potential value, if any, of such theories to Defence.

The Ministry of Defence has released the findings of this study in response to a Freedom of Information request and we are pleased to now make it available to a wider audience via the MOD Freedom of Information Disclosure Log.


The documents are a very interesting read and well worth the download. As a "skeptic sort", I found the conclusion in Part 2 of interest:

5.4 Conclusions
Analysis of the Subject score sheets shows that in the majority of cases the subjects failed to access the target in any degree.

...

On the basis of the scores / access it is clear that as untrained Remote Viewers the subjects were almost completely unsuccessful. However, as a baseline against which to measure trained or experienced Remote Viewers it will serve a purpose.

The conclusion of the series of experiments was undoubtedly disappointing with no one achieving any useful performance as a RV subject.


Cheers,
Zep
Last edited by Zep Tepi on Sun Feb 24, 2008 9:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Center Lane » Sun Feb 24, 2008 9:39 pm

caryn wrote:"Therefore the fact still remains that there actual tangible results from the Remote Viewing program which can be confirmed by further study of the hundreds of thousands of documents available in the Stargate collection and can not be dismissed as merely being staged.

So it would be difficult to dismiss it as merely an elaborate hoax."

I agree. In fact a research project was recently completed here in the UK at one of our universities with interesting results, which has gained considerable outside interest. A more extensive research program is being planned for the near future, as a result.


I'd be interested in seeing any report on this project.

If one is available.
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