Protests in Egypt

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Protests in Egypt

Postby jjflash » Fri Jan 28, 2011 5:42 pm

Egypt protests: Three killed in 'day of revolt'

BBC, January 27, 2011

At least three people are reported to have been killed during a day of rare anti-government protests in Egypt.

In Cairo, where the biggest rallies were held, state TV said a policeman had died in clashes. Two protesters died in Suez, doctors there said.

Thousands joined the protests after an internet campaign inspired by the uprising in Tunisia...

Twitter blocked

Activists had called for a "day of revolt" in a web message. Protests are uncommon in Egypt, which President Hosni Mubarak has ruled since 1981, tolerating little dissent...

The events in Cairo were co-ordinated on a Facebook page - tens of thousands of supporters clicked on the page to say they would take part.

The microblogging website, Twitter, has confirmed that its website has been blocked in Egypt.

Full article:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-12272836

At the time of this post, live footage and reports from within Egypt may be viewed at:

http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/
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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby Zep Tepi » Sat Jan 29, 2011 2:40 am

From Sky News:
Mubarak Sacks Cabinet As Unrest Spreads
Extract
Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak has refused to quit after four days of protests against his rule - instead he sacked his cabinet and said he would appoint a new one.

The 82-year-old president addressed the nation in a live TV appearance, saying its problems should not be dealt with through violence or chaos.

He claimed the anti-government demonstrations were part of plot to destabilise Egypt and destroy the legitimacy of his regime.


More at the above link.

I find it fascinating that this unrest appears to have been "inspired" by the recent unrest in Tunisia. What's your take?
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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby Access Denied » Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:47 am

What an amazing turn of events. It does seem technology and access to the internet has played a significant role in what appears to be a broad popular movement towards democratic ideals. From CNN…

http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/africa/01 ... .protests/

Egypt is the most populous nation in the Arab world and often a barometer for sentiment on the Arab community.

"What happens in Egypt will have an impact throughout the Arab world and the Middle East," said Edward Djerejian, a former U.S. ambassador to Israel and Syria.

[…]

They followed days of unrest that have roiled several Arab countries. Demonstrations in Tunisia were followed by protests in Algeria, Egypt, Yemen and Jordan.

"They all want the same," said Emile Hokayem of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in the Middle East, speaking of protesters in different Arab countries. "They're all protesting about growing inequalities, they're all protesting against growing nepotism. The top of the pyramid was getting richer and richer."

People are also fed up with authoritarian regimes that do not afford the people proper representation.

I hope the people get what they want and things don’t get worse before they get better.
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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby ryguy » Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:55 am

I think trying to use the Internet like this was the worst thing the Egyptian government could have done. A few sources have even reported they've killed landline phones in some areas. If there' wasn't as much support for the protesters before, I can only imagine the anti-Mubarak sentiment will be stronger than ever before now. It sure will be interesting to see how things play out.
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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby RICH-ENGLAND » Sat Jan 29, 2011 5:40 am

im not much of a politics person but i wish our governments (usa and uk) would have spent their time and money taking down some of the highly corrupt african governments instead of invading iraq, many african nations and their people are far more in need of help.

thanks

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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby jjflash » Fri Feb 04, 2011 1:55 am

Zep Tepi wrote:I find it fascinating that this unrest appears to have been "inspired" by the recent unrest in Tunisia. What's your take?


When the events in Tunisia were recently unfolding, I watched a BBC telecast in which it was reported that surrounding nations might follow suit. That broadcast aired no more than two to three weeks ago, yet prior to the outpouring of Egyptian protests. Pretty wild. I suppose it would be easy to suppose that a lot of people knew the political upheavals were coming for quite some time now, particularly when we consider the extent the Internet was clearly used to coordinate the efforts. I could only speculate about all of the implications and details, but it is indeed a fascinating chain of events.

Access Denied wrote:What an amazing turn of events. It does seem technology and access to the internet has played a significant role...


Yeah, for sure.

Actually, I do not monitor world news all that closely - I'm one of those guys that commonly sees more hype and sensationalism than substance. Once in a while a story like this will grab my attention, though, particularly considering the manners the Internet is being used in, well, warfare. I do find that interesting, and have followed U.S. military press releases, public memos, manuals, etc., that essentially define the 'net as a war zone.

I also think the ways the 'net is being used by apparent grass roots movements is extremely interesting and indeed carries long-term and important implications. For example, I was unaware of a rebellion in Iran known as the Green Movement that took place in 2009 until it was brought to my attention through the 'net. The circumstances strongly suggested to me that there might be a whole lot more to Iran than I am commonly being force fed, and the rebels were getting this message out via Youtube, Twitter and so on. For those unaware, the Green Movement was basically a pro-democracy effort within Iran, consisting of both males and what were traditionally passive females; while Muslim pro-democracy males were physically fighting and aggressively protesting, Muslim pro-democracy females particpated in rallies and took to the Internet:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_xyz6Bm28w

So I think we are just seeing the tip of the iceberg in the extent that the 'net is going to change the course of history in the political arena alone, much less overall. World governments would indeed be well advised to learn the lessons fast and well, as the rebels are indeed gaining momentum and expertise as the techniques of Internet warfare evolve.

ryguy wrote:I think trying to use the Internet like this was the worst thing the Egyptian government could have done.


Agreed. If tens of thousands were not already fed up, they would have sure become enraged when their livelihoods and entertainment, via the Internet, were taken from them. No doubt.
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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby Access Denied » Fri Feb 04, 2011 7:58 am

jjflash wrote:…traditionally passive females…

Fascinating, it never really occurred to me how access to the internet could rapidly accelerate a feminist movement in the Middle East leading to a profound social change that most of us in the West may take for granted now some 40 years since it really started to take hold…

Thanks for making me think!

Anyway, not fun seeing so many now paying the price of freedom as things have taken the inevitable turn for the worse… the good news I suppose is that which doesn’t kill them will surely only make them stronger.
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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby jjflash » Fri Feb 11, 2011 6:56 pm

In an article titled, Hosni Mubarak Resigns as President of Egypt, the Bulgarian news agency Novinite reported, "Mubarak was brought down by a 'social network revolution' as the April 6th Youth Movement used Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube to start protests against the regime, which grew to attract massive popular support."

A "social network revolution." That is indeed an interesting term and description.

Source:

http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=125180
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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby ryguy » Fri Feb 11, 2011 10:35 pm

It truly is a sign of the times - absolutely amazing.
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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby calcoastseeker » Sun Feb 13, 2011 12:44 am

I have been watching what has been going on in Egypt and Tunisia.

Every time they interview somebody they are under 30 years old.

They knew nothing other than living under Mubarack.

To watch what they did brought tears to my eyes every time.

Now they are not leaving the square.

They are cleaning it and painting it.

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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby Luck » Tue Feb 15, 2011 1:26 am

The protests are spreading...
Getting in line for a revolution
Opposition groups and ordinary citizens have taken to the streets in Yemen, Jordan, Palestine, Bahrain and Algeria recently to air their grievances and demand change. But they are not going full throttle quite yet. First, they are waiting for their brothers and sisters in Egypt to finish, as Egyptians did when Tunisians were focused on overthrowing the 23-year-old dictatorship of now deposed president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/opinion/2011/02/20112282246404549.html
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Re: Protests in Egypt

Postby jjflash » Thu Feb 17, 2011 5:58 pm

Luck wrote:The protests are spreading...
Getting in line for a revolution
Opposition groups and ordinary citizens have taken to the streets in Yemen, Jordan, Palestine, Bahrain and Algeria recently to air their grievances and demand change. But they are not going full throttle quite yet. First, they are waiting for their brothers and sisters in Egypt to finish, as Egyptians did when Tunisians were focused on overthrowing the 23-year-old dictatorship of now deposed president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/opinion/2011/02/20112282246404549.html


Yeah, I've been keeping an eye on that. Looks like it is getting pretty brutal. Big Brother appears to be growing quite tired of the wave of momentum.
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