An Ancient Genocide.

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An Ancient Genocide.

Postby mojo » Thu Oct 23, 2008 5:16 pm

An old news story which i've discussed previously on other forums. There are a number of interesting hypotheses surrounding the Gallina and their extermination.

Here's a couple of articles.

news.softpedia.com

"Almost all of [the Gallina ever found] were murdered. [Someone] was just killing them, case after case, every single time."


Gallina culture was first found in the 1930s at just a few miles from the newfound site: it was a 25 ft (7.6 m) tall circular stone tower with the remains of 16 people, all being the victims of gruesome deaths.


Perhaps whoever murdered the Gallina also drove the Anasazi away?

anthropology.net

So we can immediately see, (assuming that the dates in both articles are accurate), that both the Gallina and Anasazi people ceased to exist as ongoing residential populations in or near to the year AD 1275. At first glance, it could be argued that the prolonged drought which was at the time affecting the area, so depleted water resources that fighting for access and control of what little remained, resulted in warfare that saw various communities wiped out. However it appears only the minority Gallina were massacred, as evidenced by similar grisly finds at other sites, which is odd because if there were so few of them, it’s unlikely that they had resources in sufficient quantity to warrant others coming along to wrest control of them - indeed, it’s hard to imagine the Gallina exercised control over anything of importance, so it’s unlikely that whoever massacred them was doing so for material gain, in the guise of food, water, livestock, grain or land.


Longer version of the first article on National Geographic also.

news.nationalgeographic.com

The Gallina imo could be the answer to why the Anasazi left in such a hurry.
An interesting little murder mystery. :)
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Re: An Ancient Genocide.

Postby Jack'sDead » Thu Oct 23, 2008 10:14 pm

Or perhaps the Anasazi are responsible.

The onset of a drought, or some other cause for sudden and fierce competition for resources could motivate such action. I see that this seems to have been somewhat ruled out because they were only a small community, but any competition would be wiped out when you are in a fight for your own survival. So perhaps that Anasazi killed them, even if only to prolong their own demise.
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Re: An Ancient Genocide.

Postby mojo » Fri Oct 24, 2008 3:34 am

Jack'sDead wrote:Or perhaps the Anasazi are responsible.

The onset of a drought, or some other cause for sudden and fierce competition for resources could motivate such action. I see that this seems to have been somewhat ruled out because they were only a small community, but any competition would be wiped out when you are in a fight for your own survival. So perhaps that Anasazi killed them, even if only to prolong their own demise.


that was my initial reaction as well, but it doesn't seem to have a lot backing. One of the other theories was that because they engaged in binding to change their cranial shapes that they were seen as evil and hence indigineous communities wiped them out. Though the cranial binding theory hasn't been proved either.

I know...the Butler did it. :D
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Re: An Ancient Genocide.

Postby lost_shaman » Fri Oct 24, 2008 3:50 am

mojo wrote:
I know...the Butler did it. :D


I know this may be a bit off-the-wall, but I often wonder if the rise and fall of Mexican civilizations didn't effect small communities in the southern U.S..
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Re: An Ancient Genocide.

Postby mojo » Fri Oct 24, 2008 6:15 am

lost_shaman wrote:
mojo wrote:
I know...the Butler did it. :D


I know this may be a bit off-the-wall, but I often wonder if the rise and fall of Mexican civilizations didn't effect small communities in the southern U.S..


i'm sure thats true, there had to be refugee's from those events, the theory regarding the Moche seemed to make sense imo.
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Re: An Ancient Genocide.

Postby Jack'sDead » Sat Oct 25, 2008 8:58 pm

lost_shaman wrote:I know this may be a bit off-the-wall, but I often wonder if the rise and fall of Mexican civilizations didn't effect small communities in the southern U.S..


I think that even today we take for granted how we are affected by neighboring towns, cities, countries, etc. Take the game Scrabble for instance. Imagine a world without Scrabble. Not earth-shaking perhaps, but think of the prominent role it has played in our culture. Now can you tell me where it was invented? Poughkeepsie, New York. Do you even know where Poughkeepsie is?

Point being, I think that this perception of solitude is compounded as we look back in time. Everything becomes static. We don't see the ways things were interconnected. In many cases, we can't. There is no physcial evidence. What are the chances that in 10,000 years from now archaeologists will be able to uncover solid proof that Scrabble was invented in Poughkeepsie?
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Re: An Ancient Genocide.

Postby Jack'sDead » Sat Oct 25, 2008 9:02 pm

mojo wrote:that was my initial reaction as well, but it doesn't seem to have a lot backing. One of the other theories was that because they engaged in binding to change their cranial shapes that they were seen as evil and hence indigineous communities wiped them out. Though the cranial binding theory hasn't been proved either.


Interesting, but doesn't really seem to fit too well for me. I think ancient peoples were far more accustomed to diversity than we are today even. What we view as bizarre among ancient cultures, might have been viewed with indifference by their contemporaries, having no real basis to have formed such opinions. I would think more that the binding would have led European explorers to come to the conclusion that these people were some sort of "demon spawn."
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